Paths forced into the palm of your hand

Caves gallery, Melbourne

Paths forced into the palm of your hand is the title of the exhibition especially conceived by Alberto Scodro for the space of Caves Gallery, gallery located inside the historic Nicolas Building in Melbourne.

The exhibition is the result of a performative interactive process, between artist, space and external input consisting of a few objects brought by the artist.

The title Paths Forced in the Palm of your Hand is borrowed from Khorakhanè a song by the Italian singer-songwriter Fabrizio de Andrè. that talks about the nomadism in Europe and immediately gives several clues to understand the show.
The exhibition could indeed and literally be entirely contained in the palm of hand:
It is indeed essentially made up of 3 objects:
A fishing rod, an umbrella and magnifying glasses.
All the interventions within the space are expressed through lines or projections.

The three objects on display are all linked to liquid environments and are to be used as extensions of the human body, to shelter it, help it feed itself or make its vision more acute. In the present case, these objects are put into relation with the walls, floor and lights of the space.
Magnifying glasses are used to project the inside structure of the LED lights on the floor. They are conveyed through a transparent plastic pipe normally used for water and use as a regulator for the focal of the lenses.
On one side of the room, an inclined load-bearing column of the building is hooked in and put in tension by a fishing rod, which seemingly bends it inwards, as if it were putting the building in tension from its very foundations.
The shaft of an umbrella is planted on the floor, following a furrow on the floor, leading to a drawing directly executed on the wall with pencil and saliva, using some existing holes in the wall as starting points for the network of lines of the composition.

The simple and effective gestures with which this set of objects, all connected to situations of water and light, are put into relation with architectural elements or features of the exhibition space illustrate the concept of “germination” recurrent in Scodro’s practice.
The simple gestures with which this set of objects, all connected to situations of water and light, are put into relation with architectural elements or features of the exhibition space illustrate an idea of “germination” recurrent in Scodro’s practice.

The almost chirurgical apprehension of the space, the resonance he creates with the symbolic value of the added inserted artefacts, through the tracing and setting up of new lines of tension, enhance the expressive potential of the architecture. They make use of the space as a central and decisive actor of the installation, therefore implicitly questioning any restrictive definition or separation of what is container or what is content.